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Jahrmarktzauberer Oscar Oz Diggs gerät mit einem Heißluftballon in einen Wirbelsturm und landet in der Wunderwelt von Oz. Dort muss er mit Witz, Herz und Magie gegen zwei böse Hexen kämpfen, um die Bewohner zu retten. Die fantastische Welt von Oz (Originaltitel Oz the Great and Powerful) ist ein US-​amerikanischer 3D-Fantasy-Film des Regisseurs Sam Raimi aus dem Jahr. Anfang und Schluss des Films, die in der Heimatstadt des Mädchens Dorothy spielen, sind als Schwarzweißfilm gedreht worden. Die Handlung in Oz wurde als. Die fantastische Welt von Oz ein Film von Sam Raimi mit James Franco, Mila Kunis. Inhaltsangabe: Oscar Diggs (James Franco) ist ein kleiner Zirkus-Magier mit. pacekarlstad.se: Finden Sie Oz - Eine fantastische Welt in unserem vielfältigen DVD- Entdecken Sie hier reduzierte Filme und Serien auf DVD oder Blu-ray.

oz film

Die fantastische Welt von Oz (Originaltitel Oz the Great and Powerful) ist ein US-​amerikanischer 3D-Fantasy-Film des Regisseurs Sam Raimi aus dem Jahr. pacekarlstad.se: Finden Sie Oz - Eine fantastische Welt in unserem vielfältigen DVD- Entdecken Sie hier reduzierte Filme und Serien auf DVD oder Blu-ray. Die Klassiker-Verfilmung Der Zauberer von Oz von Lyman Frank Kinderbuchs schickt die kleine Dorothy auf den Weg zum Zauberer von Oz.

Oz Film Inhaltsangabe & Details

Alleine das macht ihn sehenswert. Have fun with … But as for love — well, love will be harder to come by. Beim Versuch, aus der Burg zu fliehen, werden sie von der Hexe learn more here ihren Wachen in die Enge getrieben. Die Regenbogenfahne wurde aber nicht durch das Lied inspiriert, topic schlag den star 2019 with diese Verknüpfung entstand erst später. Oz gelingt es sich festzuhalten und fliegenden Trümmerteilen auszuweichen. Das positive zuerst: Der Film sieht verdammt gut aus, ist solide gespielt und oz film super natural staffel 11 schöne Szenen und witzige Momente. So entsteht auch ein starker Bezug zu dem gänzlich ohne Computeranimationen inszenierten Der Zauberer von Oz aus dem Jahrdessen Kulissen für unsere heutigen Sehgewohnheiten ebenfalls wenig überzeugend wirken. Just click for source House. Bert Lahr.

Oz Film Video

OZ the Great and Powerful Movie CLIP - Theodora's Transformation (2013) - Mila Kunis Movie HD

Retrieved March 10, There are other interesting "that explains it" moments as well. We get up-close-and-personal with The Cowardly Lion and find out what spooked him into being afraid of his own shadow.

We get to know the Tin Man's father and the creators of the Scarecrow and learn more about Munchkinland. Retrieved February 15, Retrieved April 9, The Guardian.

Retrieved 19 March Retrieved March 7, Archived from the original on July 19, Retrieved March 11, CBS Television. Retrieved May 12, Film Freak Central.

Archived from the original on February 18, Retrieved January 13, Jim Hill Media. Archived from the original on March 7, Retrieved July 13, Retrieved January 14, South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Retrieved June 5, Chicago Reader. Archived from the original on October 11, American Hollywood. Intellect Books. ET Online. March 5, Retrieved March 15, Retrieved September 22, Huffington Post.

Los Angeles Times. April 20, Retrieved July 15, Archived from the original on January 21, We're trying to nod lovingly in its direction and make our own original, fun, wacky, emotional story that lives on its own.

Raimi: Round II". Archived from the original on February 17, Retrieved February 17, June 10, Retrieved January 31, If you really broke it down, they're completely different.

The elements in those two movies are completely different. Disney Parks Blog. Retrieved March 9, The Mercury. Disney bets audiences are ready to ireturn".

Retrieved March 1, Retrieved February 28, Nicotero is connection". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 28 July PR Newswire.

Archived from the original on February 19, Walt Disney Pictures via Reuters. February 6, Retrieved February 18, Retrieved February 22, Film Music Reporter.

The Wrap. The 3D factor is going to give "Oz" a lift as well. Of the 3, theaters that will be screening the "Wizard of Oz" prequel, 3, will be 3D and will be Imax theaters, and they'll be charging premium prices.

The Walt Disney Studios. February 12, Archived from the original on July 17, The Orlando Sentinel. The Disney Parks Blog.

May 2, Retrieved May 2, Retrieved 7 June Retrieved The Numbers. Retrieved 30 January Retrieved June 9, Retrieved August 30, Retrieved May 25, CBS News.

March 11, Internet Movie Database. Retrieved May 26, Retrieved October 1, Retrieved April 13, Rotten Tomatoes. January 5, Retrieved March 18, Retrieved March 8, Retrieved March 6, Chicago Sun-Times.

Retrieved 18 February May 5, Archived from the original on May 10, Retrieved May 10, Retrieved 25 February April 13, People's Choice Awards.

Retrieved 17 January Retrieved December 2, Bleeding Cool. Retrieved March 14, Retrieved May 31, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

John R. Political interpretations Copyright status. Adaptations and other derivative works. Sam Raimi. Unrealized projects.

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Download as PDF Printable version. Oz by L. Frank Baum. Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. Sony Scoring Stage. Total length:.

Costume Designers Guild [91]. Gary Jones and Michael Kutsche. Golden Trailer Awards [92]. Kids' Choice Awards [93]. MTV Movie Awards [94].

Best Villain. People's Choice Awards [95]. Satellite Awards [96]. Best Visual Effects. Best Art Direction and Production Design. Best Costume Design.

Best Fantasy Film. Best Costume. Teen Choice Awards. Michelle Williams. Visual Effects Society. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Oz the Great and Powerful.

Because of a perceived need to attract a youthful audience through appealing to modern fads and styles, the score had featured a song called "The Jitterbug", and the script had featured a scene with a series of musical contests.

A spoiled, selfish princess in Oz had outlawed all forms of music except classical and operetta and went up against Dorothy in a singing contest in which her swing style enchanted listeners and won the grand prize.

This part was initially written for Betty Jaynes. Another scene, which was removed before final script approval and never filmed, was an epilogue scene back in Kansas after Dorothy's return.

Hunk the Kansan counterpart to the Scarecrow is leaving for an agricultural college and extracts a promise from Dorothy to write to him. The scene implies that romance will eventually develop between the two, which also may have been intended as an explanation for Dorothy's partiality for the Scarecrow over her other two companions.

This plot idea was never totally dropped, but is especially noticeable in the final script when Dorothy, just before she is to leave Oz, tells the Scarecrow, "I think I'll miss you most of all.

Much attention was given to the use of color in the production, with the MGM production crew favoring some hues over others.

It took the studio's art department almost a week to settle on the shade of yellow used for the yellow brick road. Several actresses were reportedly considered for the part of Dorothy, including Shirley Temple , at the time, the most prominent child star; Deanna Durbin , a relative newcomer, with a recognised operatic voice; and Judy Garland , the most experienced of the three.

Officially, the decision to cast Garland was attributed to contractual issues. Now unhappy with his role as the Tin Man reportedly claiming, "I'm not a tin performer; I'm fluid" , Bolger convinced producer Mervyn LeRoy to recast him in the part he so desired.

Fields was originally chosen for the title role of the Wizard, a role turned down by Ed Wynn as he thought the part was too small, but the studio ran out of patience after protracted haggling over Fields' fee.

Wallace Beery lobbied for the role, but the studio refused to spare him during the long shooting schedule. Instead, another contract player, Frank Morgan , was cast on September An extensive talent search produced over a hundred little people to play Munchkins; this meant that most of the film's Oz sequences would have to already be shot before work on the Munchkinland sequence could begin.

Meinhardt Raabe , who played the coroner, revealed in the documentary The Making of the Wizard of Oz that the MGM costume and wardrobe department, under the direction of designer Adrian , had to design over costumes for the Munchkin sequences.

They then had to photograph and catalog each Munchkin in his or her costume so that they could correctly apply the same costume and makeup each day of production.

Gale Sondergaard was originally cast as the Wicked Witch. She became unhappy when the witch's persona shifted from sly and glamorous thought to emulate the wicked queen in Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs into the familiar "ugly hag".

Sondergaard said in an interview for a bonus feature on the DVD that she had no regrets about turning down the part, and would go on to play a glamorous villainess in Fox's version of Maurice Maeterlinck 's The Blue Bird in ; [27] Margaret Hamilton played a role remarkably similar to the Wicked Witch in the Judy Garland film Babes in Arms According to Aljean Harmetz, the "gone-to-seed" coat worn by Morgan as the wizard was selected from a rack of coats purchased from a second-hand shop.

According to legend, Morgan later discovered a label in the coat indicating it had once belonged to Baum, that Baum's widow confirmed this, and that the coat was eventually presented to her.

But Baum biographer Michael Patrick Hearn says the Baum family denies ever seeing the coat or knowing of the story; Hamilton considered it to be a rumor concocted by the studio.

Filming for The Wizard of Oz started on October 13, on the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio lot in Culver City, California , with Richard Thorpe as director, replacing the original director, Norman Taurog , who filmed a few early Technicolor tests and was then reassigned.

Thorpe initially shot about two weeks of footage, nine days in total, involving Dorothy's first encounter with the Scarecrow, as well as a number of sequences in the Wicked Witch's castle, such as Dorothy's rescue, which, though unreleased, includes the only footage of Buddy Ebsen 's Tin Man.

The production faced the challenge of simulating the Tin Man's costume. Several tests were done to find the right makeup and clothes for Ebsen.

He was hospitalized in critical condition and subsequently was forced to leave the project; in a later interview included on the DVD release of The Wizard of Oz , he recalled the studio heads appreciated the seriousness of his illness only after seeing him in the hospital.

Filming halted while a replacement for him was found. His replacement, Jack Haley , simply assumed he had been fired.

George Cukor did not actually shoot any scenes for the film, merely acting as something of a "creative advisor" to the troubled production and because of his prior commitment to direct Gone with the Wind , he left on November 3, when Victor Fleming assumed directorial responsibility.

As director, Fleming chose not to shift the film from Cukor's creative realignment, as producer LeRoy had already pronounced his satisfaction with the new course the film was taking.

Production on the bulk of the Technicolor sequences was a long and exhausting process that ran for over six months, from October to March Bolger later said that the frightening nature of the costumes prevented most of the Oz principals from eating in the studio commissary; [32] the toxicity of Hamilton's copper-based makeup forced her to eat a liquid diet on shoot days.

All the Oz sequences were filmed in three-strip Technicolor. The movie was not the first to use Technicolor, which was introduced in The Gulf Between , released in In Hamilton's exit from Munchkinland, a concealed elevator was arranged to lower her below stage level as fire and smoke erupted to dramatize and conceal her exit.

The first take ran well, but in the second take, the burst of fire came too soon. The flames set fire to her green, copper-based face paint, causing third-degree burns on her hands and face.

She spent three months healing before returning to work. The next day, the studio assigned Fleming's friend, King Vidor , as director, in order to finish the filming of The Wizard of Oz mainly the early sepia-toned Kansas sequences, including Garland's singing of " Over the Rainbow " and the tornado.

Although the film was a hit in , Vidor chose not to take public credit for his contribution until his friend died in Arnold Gillespie was the special effects director for the film.

Gillespie worked with the production using several visual effects techniques for the movie. Gillespie used muslin cloth to make the tornado flexible after a previous attempt with rubber failed.

He hung the 35 feet of muslin from a steel gantry and connected the bottom to a rod. By moving the gantry and rod, he was able to create the illusion of a tornado moving across the stage.

Fuller's earth was sprayed from both the top and bottom using compressed air hoses to complete the effect. Dorothy's house was recreated by using a model.

The Cowardly Lion and Scarecrow masks were made of foam latex makeup created by makeup artist Jack Dawn , who was one of the first makeup artists to use this technique.

It took an hour each day to slowly peel the glued-on mask from his face. At the time, she was wearing her green makeup, which was usually removed with acetone due to its toxic copper content.

Because of Hamilton's burns, makeup artist Jack Young removed the makeup with alcohol, to prevent infection.

The film is famous for its musical selections and soundtrack. The song ranked first in the AFI's Years Georgie Stoll was associate conductor, and screen credit was given to George Bassman , Murray Cutter , Ken Darby and Paul Marquardt for orchestral and vocal arrangements as usual, Roger Edens was also heavily involved as an unbilled musical associate to Freed.

The songs were recorded in the studio's scoring stage before filming. Several of the recordings were completed while Ebsen was still with the cast.

Therefore, although he had to be dropped from the cast because of a dangerous reaction to the aluminum powder makeup, his singing voice remained on the soundtrack as mentioned in the notes for the CD Deluxe Edition.

His voice can be heard in the group vocals of "We're Off to See the Wizard". Haley rerecorded Ebsen's solo parts later.

Bolger's original recording of " If I Only Had a Brain " was far more sedate than the version heard in the film.

During filming, Cukor and LeRoy decided that a more energetic rendition would better suit Dorothy's initial meeting with the Scarecrow, and the song was rerecorded.

The original version was thought to be lost until a copy was discovered in The song "The Jitterbug", written in a swing style, was intended for the sequence in which the group is journeying to the Witch's castle.

Due to time constraints, the song was cut from the final theatrical version. The film footage for the song has been lost, although silent home film footage of rehearsals for the number has survived.

The sound recording for the song, however, is intact and was included in the two-CD Rhino Records deluxe edition of the film soundtrack, as well as on the VHS and DVD editions of the film.

A reference to "The Jitterbug" remains in the film: the Witch remarks to her flying monkeys that they should have no trouble apprehending Dorothy and her friends because "I've sent a little insect on ahead to take the fight out of them.

Another musical number cut before release came right after the Wicked Witch of the West was melted and before Dorothy and her friends returned to the Wizard.

This was a reprise of "Ding-Dong! The witch is dead! The Wicked Witch is dead! Today, the film of this scene is also lost, and only a few stills survive, along with a few seconds of footage used on several reissue trailers.

The entire audio track still exists and is included on the two-CD Rhino Record deluxe edition of the film soundtrack.

In addition, Garland was to sing a brief reprise of "Over the Rainbow" while Dorothy is trapped in the Witch's castle, but it was cut because it was considered too emotionally intense.

The original soundtrack recording still exists, however, and was included as an extra in all home media releases from onwards.

Extensive edits in the film's final cut removed vocals from the last portion of the film. However, the film was fully underscored , with instrumental snippets from the film's various leitmotifs throughout.

There was also some recognizable classical and popular music, including:. Principal photography concluded with the Kansas sequences on March 16, Reshoots and pick-up shots were filmed throughout April and May and into June, under the direction of producer LeRoy.

After the deletion of the "Over the Rainbow" reprise after subsequent test screenings in early June, Garland had to be brought back one more time to reshoot the "Auntie Em, I'm frightened!

The footage of Blandick's Aunt Em, as shot by Vidor, had already been set aside for rear-projection work, and was simply reused. After Hamilton's torturous experience with the Munchkinland elevator, she refused to do the pick-ups for the scene in which she flies on a broomstick that billows smoke, so LeRoy had stand-in Betty Danko perform, instead.

Danko was severely injured due to a malfunction in the smoke mechanism. At this point, the film began a long, arduous post-production.

Herbert Stothart had to compose the film's background score, while A. Arnold Gillespie had to perfect the various special effects that the film required, including many of the rear projection shots.

The MGM art department also had to create various matte paintings for the backgrounds of many of the scenes.

One significant innovation planned for the film was the use of stencil printing for the transition to Technicolor. Each frame was to be hand-tinted to maintain the sepia tone.

During the reshoots in May, the inside of the farm house was painted sepia, and when Dorothy opens the door, it is not Garland, but her stand-in, Bobbie Koshay, wearing a sepia gingham dress, who then backs out of frame.

Once the camera moves through the door, Garland steps back into frame in her bright blue gingham dress as noted in DVD extras , and the sepia-painted door briefly tints her with the same color before she emerges from the house's shadow, into the bright glare of the Technicolor lighting.

This also meant that the reshoots provided the first proper shot of Munchkinland. If one looks carefully, the brief cut to Dorothy looking around outside the house bisects a single long shot, from the inside of the doorway to the pan-around that finally ends in a reverse-angle as the ruins of the house are seen behind Dorothy and she comes to a stop at the foot of the small bridge.

Test screenings of the film began on June 5, In , the average movie ran for about 90 minutes. LeRoy and Fleming knew they needed to cut at least 15 minutes to get the film down to a manageable running time.

The Witch Is Dead ", and a number of smaller dialogue sequences. This left the final, mostly serious portion of the film with no songs, only the dramatic underscoring.

MGM felt that it made the Kansas sequence too long, as well as being far over the heads of the target audience of children. The studio also thought that it was degrading for Garland to sing in a barnyard.

LeRoy, uncredited associate producer Arthur Freed and director Fleming fought to keep it in, and they eventually won. The song went on to win the Academy Award for Best Song of the Year and came to be identified so strongly with Garland herself that she made it her theme song.

After the preview in San Luis Obispo in early July, the film was officially released in August at its current minute running time. They continued to perform there after each screening for a week.

Garland extended her appearance for two more weeks, partnered with Rooney for a second week and with Oz co-stars Ray Bolger and Bert Lahr for the third and final week.

The film opened nationwide on August 25, It was repeated on December 13, , and gained an even larger television audience, with a Nielsen rating of It became an annual television tradition.

The film was released multiple times to the home-video commercial market on a limited scale on Super 8 film 8 mm format during the s.

These releases include an edited English version roughly 10 minutes, and roughly 20 minutes , as well as edited Spanish versions.

In the s, a full commercial release was made on Super 8 on multiple reels. The film's first LaserDisc release was in In , there were two releases for the 50th anniversary, one from Turner and one from The Criterion Collection , with a commentary track.

Laserdiscs came out in and , and the final LaserDisc was released on September 11, It contained no special features or supplements.

On October 19, , Oz was re-released by Warner Bros to celebrate the picture's 60th anniversary, with its soundtrack presented in a new 5.

The DVD also contained a behind-the-scenes documentary, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic , produced in and hosted by Angela Lansbury , which was originally shown on television immediately following the telecast of the film.

It had been featured in the "Ultimate Oz" LaserDisc release. Outtakes, the deleted "Jitterbug" musical number, clips of pre Oz adaptations, trailers, newsreels, and a portrait gallery were also included, as well as two radio programs of the era publicizing the film.

In , two DVD editions were released, both featuring a newly restored version of the film with an audio commentary and an isolated music and effects track.

One of the two DVD releases was a "Two-Disc Special Edition", featuring production documentaries, trailers, various outtakes, newsreels, radio shows and still galleries.

The other set, a "Three-Disc Collector's Edition", included these features, as well as the digitally restored 80th-anniversary edition of the feature-length silent film version of The Wizard of Oz , other silent Oz adaptations and a animated short version.

For this edition, Warner Bros. The restoration job was given to Prime Focus World. On December 1, , [66] three Blu-ray discs of the Ultimate Collector's Edition were repackaged as a less expensive "Emerald Edition".

A single-disc Blu-ray, containing the restored movie and all the extra features of the two-disc Special Edition DVD, became available on March 16, Many special editions were released in celebration of the film's 75th anniversary in , including one exclusively by Best Buy a SteelBook of the 3D Blu-ray and another by Target stores that came with a keepsake lunch bag.

Although the re-issue used sepia tone, as in the original film, beginning with the re-issue, and continuing until the film's 50th anniversary VHS release in , the opening Kansas sequences were shown in black and white instead of the sepia tone as originally printed.

This includes television showings. For the film's upcoming 60th anniversary, Warner Bros. In , the film had a very limited re-release in U.

On September 23, , the film was re-released in select theaters for a one-night-only event in honor of its 70th anniversary and as a promotion for various new disc releases later in the month.

An encore of this event took place in theaters on November 17, An IMAX 3D theatrical re-release played at theaters in North America for one week only beginning September 20, , as part of the film's 75th anniversary.

It was the first picture to play at the new theater and served as the grand opening of Hollywood's first 3D IMAX screen.

It was also shown as a special presentation at the Toronto International Film Festival. According to MPAA rules, a film that has been altered in any way from its original version must be submitted for re-classification, and the 3-D conversion fell within that guideline.

Surprisingly, the 3D version received a PG rating for "Some scary moments", although no change was made to the film's original story content.

The 2D version still retains its G rating. The film was re-released by Fathom Events on January 27, 29, 30, and February 3 and 5, as part of its 80th anniversary.

It also had a one-week theatrical engagement in Dolby Cinema on October 25, to commemorate the anniversary. The Wizard of Oz received widespread acclaim upon its release.

Writing for The New York Times , Frank Nugent considered the film a "delightful piece of wonder-working which had the youngsters' eyes shining and brought a quietly amused gleam to the wiser ones of the oldsters.

Not since Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs has anything quite so fantastic succeeded half so well. Nor can they, without a few betraying jolts and split-screen overlappings, bring down from the sky the great soap bubble in which Glinda rides and roll it smoothly into place.

According to Nugent, "Judy Garland's Dorothy is a pert and fresh-faced miss with the wonder-lit eyes of a believer in fairy tales, but the Baum fantasy is at its best when the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Lion are on the move.

Writing in Variety , John C. Flinn predicted that the film was "likely to perform some record-breaking feats of box-office magic," noting, "Some of the scenic passages are so beautiful in design and composition as to stir audiences by their sheer unfoldment.

Harrison's Reports wrote, "Even though some persons are not interested in pictures of this type, it is possible that they will be eager to see this picture just for its technical treatment.

The performances are good, and the incidental music is of considerable aid. Pictures of this caliber bring credit to the industry.

Leo the Lion is privileged to herald this one with his deepest roar—the one that comes from way down—for seldom if indeed ever has the screen been so successful in its approach to fantasy and extravaganza through flesh-and-blood Not all reviews were positive.

Some moviegoers felt that the year-old Garland was slightly too old to play the little girl who Baum intended his Dorothy to be.

Russell Maloney of The New Yorker wrote that the film displayed "no trace of imagination, good taste, or ingenuity" and declared it "a stinkeroo," [86] while Otis Ferguson of The New Republic wrote: "It has dwarfs, music, Technicolor, freak characters, and Judy Garland.

It can't be expected to have a sense of humor, as well — and as for the light touch of fantasy, it weighs like a pound of fruitcake soaking wet.

Roger Ebert chose it as one of his Great Films, writing that " The Wizard of Oz has a wonderful surface of comedy and music, special effects and excitement, but we still watch it six decades later because its underlying story penetrates straight to the deepest insecurities of childhood, stirs them and then reassures them.

In his critique of the film for the British Film Institute, author Salman Rushdie acknowledged its affect on him, noting " The Wizard of Oz was my very first literary influence".

In a retrospective article about the film, San Francisco Chronicle film critic and author Mick LaSalle declared that the.

The site's critical consensus reads, "An absolute masterpiece whose groundbreaking visuals and deft storytelling are still every bit as resonant, The Wizard of Oz is a must-see film for young and old.

However, for all the risks and cost that MGM undertook to produce the film, it was certainly more successful than anyone thought it would be.

The film had been enormously successful as a book, and it had also been a major stage hit, but previous attempts to bring it to the screen had been dismal failures.

Among the many dramatic differences between the film and the novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz , are the era , the character of Dorothy Gale , who is 11 when she arrives in Oz and ages very little after that, and the magic slippers, which are silver.

We are not told the Tin Woodman's rather gruesome backstory in the film. He started off a human being and kept lopping off bits of himself by accident.

Baum's Oz is divided into regions where people dress in the same color. Munchkins, for example, all wear blue.

Obviously this did not lend itself to the brilliant palette that was the hallmark of Technicolor films at the time. Dorothy's adventures in the book last much longer and take her and her friends to more places in Oz.

In the end, her friends are invited to rule different areas of Oz. In some cases—including the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, the Munchkins in style if not color , Dorothy's long pigtails and the unusual Oz noses—the film's designers were clearly inspired by the book's illustrations by William Wallace Denslow.

In others, including the costumes for the witches, good and bad, they created their own visions of Oz.

An official sequel, the animated Journey Back to Oz starring Liza Minnelli , Garland's daughter, was produced to commemorate the original film's 35th anniversary.

Marvel planned a series of sequels based on the subsequent novels. The first, The Marvelous Land of Oz , was published later that year.

The next, The Marvelous Ozma of Oz was expected to be released the following year but never came to be.

With a darker story, it fared poorly with critics unfamiliar with the Oz books and was not successful at the box office, although it has since become a popular cult film , with many considering it a more loyal and faithful adaptation of what L.

Frank Baum envisioned. It was a commercial success but received a mixed reception from critics. In , independent film company Clarius Entertainment released a big-budget animated musical film, Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return , [] which follows Dorothy's second trip to Oz.

The film fared poorly at the box office and was received negatively by critics, largely for its plot and unmemorable musical numbers.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is America's greatest and best-loved home grown fairytale. The first totally American fantasy for children, it is one of the most-read children's books In , Aljean Harmetz wrote The Making of The Wizard of Oz , a detailed description of the creation of the film based on interviews and research; it was updated in Because of their iconic stature, [] the ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the film are now among the most treasured and valuable film memorabilia in movie history.

Adrian , MGM's chief costume designer, was responsible for the final design. There are five known pairs of the ruby slippers in existence.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Frank Baum. Theatrical release poster. Victor Fleming King Vidor uncredited. Harold Arlen Herbert Stothart.

Main article: Musical selections in The Wizard of Oz. Main article: The Wizard of Oz on television. Main article: Adaptations of The Wizard of Oz.

Main article: Ruby slippers. American Film Institute. Retrieved March 9, British Board of Film Classification. Retrieved August 25, Box Office Mojo.

Retrieved October 25, Retrieved August 9, New York: Warner Books. August 18, Retrieved August 15, Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 24, Library of Congress.

December 15, Retrieved April 16, Washington, D. September 19,

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Margaret Hamilton. Daraufhin schmilzt die Hexe zu einer Pfütze ein. Die erste Ausstrahlung fand am 3. Sam Raimi. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Die fantastische Welt von Oz. Harold Rosson. Planet der Affen: Prevolution. Als sie go here verwunschenen Wald ankommen, schickt die böse Hexe, die die Reisenden mit ihrer Kristallkugel beobachtet https://pacekarlstad.se/3d-filme-online-stream/leon-stream.php, ihre Armee geflügelter Affen, die Dorothy entführt. The Disney Parks Blog. Not since Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs has click quite so fantastic succeeded half so. The film fared poorly at the box office and was received negatively by critics, largely continue reading its plot and unmemorable musical numbers. University of Michigan Press. The New York Times. It was repeated read article December 13,and gained an even larger television audience, with a Nielsen rating read article PR Newswire.

Walt Disney Pictures Roth Films. My first instinct was, there are such iconic images in the Wizard of Oz movie, it would be wrong for us to re-create the Yellow Brick Road or the Emerald City in a different way.

We had to go degrees in the other direction. We're just going to have to make our own Oz. Danny Elfman. British Board of Film Classification.

February 15, Retrieved October 10, March 1, Retrieved August 14, Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 22, Box Office Mojo. August 28, Screen Rant, LLC.

Retrieved April 10, The New York Times. Retrieved March 5, December 1, Retrieved February 26, The Hollywood Reporter.

Retrieved December 10, Entertainment Weekly. New York: Time Inc. Retrieved March 16, Salisbury Post. Archived from the original on 19 July Retrieved 11 March He makes a young, svelte, rather hot conjurer who has broken many a heart, including that of Dorothy Gale's mom-to-be liquid-eyed Michelle Williams, resplendent in a blond wig.

Business Insider. Retrieved March 19, Retrieved March 10, There are other interesting "that explains it" moments as well. We get up-close-and-personal with The Cowardly Lion and find out what spooked him into being afraid of his own shadow.

We get to know the Tin Man's father and the creators of the Scarecrow and learn more about Munchkinland. Retrieved February 15, Retrieved April 9, The Guardian.

Retrieved 19 March Retrieved March 7, Archived from the original on July 19, Retrieved March 11, CBS Television. Retrieved May 12, Film Freak Central.

Archived from the original on February 18, Retrieved January 13, Jim Hill Media. Archived from the original on March 7, Retrieved July 13, Retrieved January 14, South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Retrieved June 5, Chicago Reader. Archived from the original on October 11, American Hollywood. Intellect Books. ET Online.

March 5, Retrieved March 15, Retrieved September 22, Huffington Post. Los Angeles Times. April 20, Retrieved July 15, Archived from the original on January 21, We're trying to nod lovingly in its direction and make our own original, fun, wacky, emotional story that lives on its own.

Raimi: Round II". Archived from the original on February 17, Retrieved February 17, June 10, Retrieved January 31, If you really broke it down, they're completely different.

The elements in those two movies are completely different. Disney Parks Blog. Retrieved March 9, The Mercury. Disney bets audiences are ready to ireturn".

Retrieved March 1, Retrieved February 28, Nicotero is connection". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 28 July PR Newswire.

Archived from the original on February 19, Walt Disney Pictures via Reuters. February 6, Retrieved February 18, Retrieved February 22, Film Music Reporter.

The Wrap. The 3D factor is going to give "Oz" a lift as well. Of the 3, theaters that will be screening the "Wizard of Oz" prequel, 3, will be 3D and will be Imax theaters, and they'll be charging premium prices.

The Walt Disney Studios. February 12, Archived from the original on July 17, The Orlando Sentinel. The Disney Parks Blog.

May 2, Retrieved May 2, Retrieved 7 June Retrieved The Numbers. Retrieved 30 January Retrieved June 9, Retrieved August 30, Retrieved May 25, CBS News.

March 11, Internet Movie Database. Retrieved May 26, Retrieved October 1, Retrieved April 13, Rotten Tomatoes.

January 5, Retrieved March 18, Retrieved March 8, Retrieved March 6, Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 18 February May 5, Archived from the original on May 10, Retrieved May 10, Retrieved 25 February April 13, People's Choice Awards.

Retrieved 17 January Retrieved December 2, Bleeding Cool. Retrieved March 14, Retrieved May 31, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

John R. Political interpretations Copyright status. Adaptations and other derivative works. Sam Raimi. Unrealized projects. Everyone dismisses her adventure as a dream, but Dorothy insists it was real and says she will never run away from home again before declaring, "There's no place like home!

Production on the film began when Walt Disney 's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs showed that films adapted from popular children's stories and fairytale folklore could still be successful.

The script went through several writers and revisions before the final shooting. Cannon , had submitted a brief four-page outline.

In his outline, the Scarecrow was a man so stupid that the only employment open to him was literally scaring crows from cornfields, while the Tin Woodman was a criminal so heartless he was sentenced to be placed in a tin suit for eternity, torture that softened him into somebody gentler and kinder.

Afterward, LeRoy hired screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz , who soon delivered a page draft of the Kansas scenes and a few weeks later, a further 56 pages.

He also hired Noel Langley and poet Ogden Nash to write separate versions of the story. None of these three knew about the others, and this was not an uncommon procedure.

Nash delivered a four-page outline, Langley turned in a page treatment and a full film script. He [ who? Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf submitted a script and were brought on board to touch up the writing.

They would be responsible for making sure the story stayed true to the Baum book. However, producer Arthur Freed was unhappy with their work and reassigned it to Langley.

Also, Jack Haley and Bert Lahr are known to have written some of their dialogue for the Kansas sequence.

They completed the final draft of the script on October 8, , following numerous rewrites. So anyhow, Yip also wrote all the dialogue in that time and the setup to the songs and he also wrote the part where they give out the heart, the brains, and the nerve, because he was the final script editor.

And he — there was eleven screenwriters on that — and he pulled the whole thing together, wrote his own lines and gave the thing a coherence and unity which made it a work of art.

But he doesn't get credit for that. He gets lyrics by E. Harburg, you see. But nevertheless, he put his influence on the thing.

The original producers thought that a audience was too sophisticated to accept Oz as a straight-ahead fantasy; therefore, it was re-conceived as a lengthy, elaborate dream sequence.

Because of a perceived need to attract a youthful audience through appealing to modern fads and styles, the score had featured a song called "The Jitterbug", and the script had featured a scene with a series of musical contests.

A spoiled, selfish princess in Oz had outlawed all forms of music except classical and operetta and went up against Dorothy in a singing contest in which her swing style enchanted listeners and won the grand prize.

This part was initially written for Betty Jaynes. Another scene, which was removed before final script approval and never filmed, was an epilogue scene back in Kansas after Dorothy's return.

Hunk the Kansan counterpart to the Scarecrow is leaving for an agricultural college and extracts a promise from Dorothy to write to him. The scene implies that romance will eventually develop between the two, which also may have been intended as an explanation for Dorothy's partiality for the Scarecrow over her other two companions.

This plot idea was never totally dropped, but is especially noticeable in the final script when Dorothy, just before she is to leave Oz, tells the Scarecrow, "I think I'll miss you most of all.

Much attention was given to the use of color in the production, with the MGM production crew favoring some hues over others.

It took the studio's art department almost a week to settle on the shade of yellow used for the yellow brick road. Several actresses were reportedly considered for the part of Dorothy, including Shirley Temple , at the time, the most prominent child star; Deanna Durbin , a relative newcomer, with a recognised operatic voice; and Judy Garland , the most experienced of the three.

Officially, the decision to cast Garland was attributed to contractual issues. Now unhappy with his role as the Tin Man reportedly claiming, "I'm not a tin performer; I'm fluid" , Bolger convinced producer Mervyn LeRoy to recast him in the part he so desired.

Fields was originally chosen for the title role of the Wizard, a role turned down by Ed Wynn as he thought the part was too small, but the studio ran out of patience after protracted haggling over Fields' fee.

Wallace Beery lobbied for the role, but the studio refused to spare him during the long shooting schedule. Instead, another contract player, Frank Morgan , was cast on September An extensive talent search produced over a hundred little people to play Munchkins; this meant that most of the film's Oz sequences would have to already be shot before work on the Munchkinland sequence could begin.

Meinhardt Raabe , who played the coroner, revealed in the documentary The Making of the Wizard of Oz that the MGM costume and wardrobe department, under the direction of designer Adrian , had to design over costumes for the Munchkin sequences.

They then had to photograph and catalog each Munchkin in his or her costume so that they could correctly apply the same costume and makeup each day of production.

Gale Sondergaard was originally cast as the Wicked Witch. She became unhappy when the witch's persona shifted from sly and glamorous thought to emulate the wicked queen in Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs into the familiar "ugly hag".

Sondergaard said in an interview for a bonus feature on the DVD that she had no regrets about turning down the part, and would go on to play a glamorous villainess in Fox's version of Maurice Maeterlinck 's The Blue Bird in ; [27] Margaret Hamilton played a role remarkably similar to the Wicked Witch in the Judy Garland film Babes in Arms According to Aljean Harmetz, the "gone-to-seed" coat worn by Morgan as the wizard was selected from a rack of coats purchased from a second-hand shop.

According to legend, Morgan later discovered a label in the coat indicating it had once belonged to Baum, that Baum's widow confirmed this, and that the coat was eventually presented to her.

But Baum biographer Michael Patrick Hearn says the Baum family denies ever seeing the coat or knowing of the story; Hamilton considered it to be a rumor concocted by the studio.

Filming for The Wizard of Oz started on October 13, on the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio lot in Culver City, California , with Richard Thorpe as director, replacing the original director, Norman Taurog , who filmed a few early Technicolor tests and was then reassigned.

Thorpe initially shot about two weeks of footage, nine days in total, involving Dorothy's first encounter with the Scarecrow, as well as a number of sequences in the Wicked Witch's castle, such as Dorothy's rescue, which, though unreleased, includes the only footage of Buddy Ebsen 's Tin Man.

The production faced the challenge of simulating the Tin Man's costume. Several tests were done to find the right makeup and clothes for Ebsen.

He was hospitalized in critical condition and subsequently was forced to leave the project; in a later interview included on the DVD release of The Wizard of Oz , he recalled the studio heads appreciated the seriousness of his illness only after seeing him in the hospital.

Filming halted while a replacement for him was found. His replacement, Jack Haley , simply assumed he had been fired. George Cukor did not actually shoot any scenes for the film, merely acting as something of a "creative advisor" to the troubled production and because of his prior commitment to direct Gone with the Wind , he left on November 3, when Victor Fleming assumed directorial responsibility.

As director, Fleming chose not to shift the film from Cukor's creative realignment, as producer LeRoy had already pronounced his satisfaction with the new course the film was taking.

Production on the bulk of the Technicolor sequences was a long and exhausting process that ran for over six months, from October to March Bolger later said that the frightening nature of the costumes prevented most of the Oz principals from eating in the studio commissary; [32] the toxicity of Hamilton's copper-based makeup forced her to eat a liquid diet on shoot days.

All the Oz sequences were filmed in three-strip Technicolor. The movie was not the first to use Technicolor, which was introduced in The Gulf Between , released in In Hamilton's exit from Munchkinland, a concealed elevator was arranged to lower her below stage level as fire and smoke erupted to dramatize and conceal her exit.

The first take ran well, but in the second take, the burst of fire came too soon. The flames set fire to her green, copper-based face paint, causing third-degree burns on her hands and face.

She spent three months healing before returning to work. The next day, the studio assigned Fleming's friend, King Vidor , as director, in order to finish the filming of The Wizard of Oz mainly the early sepia-toned Kansas sequences, including Garland's singing of " Over the Rainbow " and the tornado.

Although the film was a hit in , Vidor chose not to take public credit for his contribution until his friend died in Arnold Gillespie was the special effects director for the film.

Gillespie worked with the production using several visual effects techniques for the movie. Gillespie used muslin cloth to make the tornado flexible after a previous attempt with rubber failed.

He hung the 35 feet of muslin from a steel gantry and connected the bottom to a rod. By moving the gantry and rod, he was able to create the illusion of a tornado moving across the stage.

Fuller's earth was sprayed from both the top and bottom using compressed air hoses to complete the effect. Dorothy's house was recreated by using a model.

The Cowardly Lion and Scarecrow masks were made of foam latex makeup created by makeup artist Jack Dawn , who was one of the first makeup artists to use this technique.

It took an hour each day to slowly peel the glued-on mask from his face. At the time, she was wearing her green makeup, which was usually removed with acetone due to its toxic copper content.

Because of Hamilton's burns, makeup artist Jack Young removed the makeup with alcohol, to prevent infection.

The film is famous for its musical selections and soundtrack. The song ranked first in the AFI's Years Georgie Stoll was associate conductor, and screen credit was given to George Bassman , Murray Cutter , Ken Darby and Paul Marquardt for orchestral and vocal arrangements as usual, Roger Edens was also heavily involved as an unbilled musical associate to Freed.

The songs were recorded in the studio's scoring stage before filming. Several of the recordings were completed while Ebsen was still with the cast.

Therefore, although he had to be dropped from the cast because of a dangerous reaction to the aluminum powder makeup, his singing voice remained on the soundtrack as mentioned in the notes for the CD Deluxe Edition.

His voice can be heard in the group vocals of "We're Off to See the Wizard". Haley rerecorded Ebsen's solo parts later.

Bolger's original recording of " If I Only Had a Brain " was far more sedate than the version heard in the film. During filming, Cukor and LeRoy decided that a more energetic rendition would better suit Dorothy's initial meeting with the Scarecrow, and the song was rerecorded.

The original version was thought to be lost until a copy was discovered in The song "The Jitterbug", written in a swing style, was intended for the sequence in which the group is journeying to the Witch's castle.

Due to time constraints, the song was cut from the final theatrical version. The film footage for the song has been lost, although silent home film footage of rehearsals for the number has survived.

The sound recording for the song, however, is intact and was included in the two-CD Rhino Records deluxe edition of the film soundtrack, as well as on the VHS and DVD editions of the film.

A reference to "The Jitterbug" remains in the film: the Witch remarks to her flying monkeys that they should have no trouble apprehending Dorothy and her friends because "I've sent a little insect on ahead to take the fight out of them.

Another musical number cut before release came right after the Wicked Witch of the West was melted and before Dorothy and her friends returned to the Wizard.

This was a reprise of "Ding-Dong! The witch is dead! The Wicked Witch is dead! Today, the film of this scene is also lost, and only a few stills survive, along with a few seconds of footage used on several reissue trailers.

The entire audio track still exists and is included on the two-CD Rhino Record deluxe edition of the film soundtrack.

In addition, Garland was to sing a brief reprise of "Over the Rainbow" while Dorothy is trapped in the Witch's castle, but it was cut because it was considered too emotionally intense.

The original soundtrack recording still exists, however, and was included as an extra in all home media releases from onwards.

Extensive edits in the film's final cut removed vocals from the last portion of the film. However, the film was fully underscored , with instrumental snippets from the film's various leitmotifs throughout.

There was also some recognizable classical and popular music, including:. Principal photography concluded with the Kansas sequences on March 16, Reshoots and pick-up shots were filmed throughout April and May and into June, under the direction of producer LeRoy.

After the deletion of the "Over the Rainbow" reprise after subsequent test screenings in early June, Garland had to be brought back one more time to reshoot the "Auntie Em, I'm frightened!

The footage of Blandick's Aunt Em, as shot by Vidor, had already been set aside for rear-projection work, and was simply reused.

After Hamilton's torturous experience with the Munchkinland elevator, she refused to do the pick-ups for the scene in which she flies on a broomstick that billows smoke, so LeRoy had stand-in Betty Danko perform, instead.

Danko was severely injured due to a malfunction in the smoke mechanism. At this point, the film began a long, arduous post-production.

Herbert Stothart had to compose the film's background score, while A. Arnold Gillespie had to perfect the various special effects that the film required, including many of the rear projection shots.

The MGM art department also had to create various matte paintings for the backgrounds of many of the scenes. One significant innovation planned for the film was the use of stencil printing for the transition to Technicolor.

Each frame was to be hand-tinted to maintain the sepia tone. During the reshoots in May, the inside of the farm house was painted sepia, and when Dorothy opens the door, it is not Garland, but her stand-in, Bobbie Koshay, wearing a sepia gingham dress, who then backs out of frame.

Once the camera moves through the door, Garland steps back into frame in her bright blue gingham dress as noted in DVD extras , and the sepia-painted door briefly tints her with the same color before she emerges from the house's shadow, into the bright glare of the Technicolor lighting.

This also meant that the reshoots provided the first proper shot of Munchkinland. If one looks carefully, the brief cut to Dorothy looking around outside the house bisects a single long shot, from the inside of the doorway to the pan-around that finally ends in a reverse-angle as the ruins of the house are seen behind Dorothy and she comes to a stop at the foot of the small bridge.

Test screenings of the film began on June 5, In , the average movie ran for about 90 minutes. LeRoy and Fleming knew they needed to cut at least 15 minutes to get the film down to a manageable running time.

The Witch Is Dead ", and a number of smaller dialogue sequences. This left the final, mostly serious portion of the film with no songs, only the dramatic underscoring.

MGM felt that it made the Kansas sequence too long, as well as being far over the heads of the target audience of children.

The studio also thought that it was degrading for Garland to sing in a barnyard. LeRoy, uncredited associate producer Arthur Freed and director Fleming fought to keep it in, and they eventually won.

The song went on to win the Academy Award for Best Song of the Year and came to be identified so strongly with Garland herself that she made it her theme song.

After the preview in San Luis Obispo in early July, the film was officially released in August at its current minute running time. They continued to perform there after each screening for a week.

Garland extended her appearance for two more weeks, partnered with Rooney for a second week and with Oz co-stars Ray Bolger and Bert Lahr for the third and final week.

The film opened nationwide on August 25, It was repeated on December 13, , and gained an even larger television audience, with a Nielsen rating of It became an annual television tradition.

The film was released multiple times to the home-video commercial market on a limited scale on Super 8 film 8 mm format during the s.

These releases include an edited English version roughly 10 minutes, and roughly 20 minutes , as well as edited Spanish versions.

In the s, a full commercial release was made on Super 8 on multiple reels. The film's first LaserDisc release was in In , there were two releases for the 50th anniversary, one from Turner and one from The Criterion Collection , with a commentary track.

Laserdiscs came out in and , and the final LaserDisc was released on September 11, It contained no special features or supplements.

On October 19, , Oz was re-released by Warner Bros to celebrate the picture's 60th anniversary, with its soundtrack presented in a new 5.

The DVD also contained a behind-the-scenes documentary, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic , produced in and hosted by Angela Lansbury , which was originally shown on television immediately following the telecast of the film.

It had been featured in the "Ultimate Oz" LaserDisc release. Outtakes, the deleted "Jitterbug" musical number, clips of pre Oz adaptations, trailers, newsreels, and a portrait gallery were also included, as well as two radio programs of the era publicizing the film.

In , two DVD editions were released, both featuring a newly restored version of the film with an audio commentary and an isolated music and effects track.

One of the two DVD releases was a "Two-Disc Special Edition", featuring production documentaries, trailers, various outtakes, newsreels, radio shows and still galleries.

The other set, a "Three-Disc Collector's Edition", included these features, as well as the digitally restored 80th-anniversary edition of the feature-length silent film version of The Wizard of Oz , other silent Oz adaptations and a animated short version.

For this edition, Warner Bros. The restoration job was given to Prime Focus World. On December 1, , [66] three Blu-ray discs of the Ultimate Collector's Edition were repackaged as a less expensive "Emerald Edition".

A single-disc Blu-ray, containing the restored movie and all the extra features of the two-disc Special Edition DVD, became available on March 16, Many special editions were released in celebration of the film's 75th anniversary in , including one exclusively by Best Buy a SteelBook of the 3D Blu-ray and another by Target stores that came with a keepsake lunch bag.

Although the re-issue used sepia tone, as in the original film, beginning with the re-issue, and continuing until the film's 50th anniversary VHS release in , the opening Kansas sequences were shown in black and white instead of the sepia tone as originally printed.

This includes television showings. For the film's upcoming 60th anniversary, Warner Bros. In , the film had a very limited re-release in U.

On September 23, , the film was re-released in select theaters for a one-night-only event in honor of its 70th anniversary and as a promotion for various new disc releases later in the month.

An encore of this event took place in theaters on November 17, An IMAX 3D theatrical re-release played at theaters in North America for one week only beginning September 20, , as part of the film's 75th anniversary.

It was the first picture to play at the new theater and served as the grand opening of Hollywood's first 3D IMAX screen. It was also shown as a special presentation at the Toronto International Film Festival.

According to MPAA rules, a film that has been altered in any way from its original version must be submitted for re-classification, and the 3-D conversion fell within that guideline.

Surprisingly, the 3D version received a PG rating for "Some scary moments", although no change was made to the film's original story content.

The 2D version still retains its G rating. The film was re-released by Fathom Events on January 27, 29, 30, and February 3 and 5, as part of its 80th anniversary.

It also had a one-week theatrical engagement in Dolby Cinema on October 25, to commemorate the anniversary. The Wizard of Oz received widespread acclaim upon its release.

Writing for The New York Times , Frank Nugent considered the film a "delightful piece of wonder-working which had the youngsters' eyes shining and brought a quietly amused gleam to the wiser ones of the oldsters.

Not since Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs has anything quite so fantastic succeeded half so well. Nor can they, without a few betraying jolts and split-screen overlappings, bring down from the sky the great soap bubble in which Glinda rides and roll it smoothly into place.

According to Nugent, "Judy Garland's Dorothy is a pert and fresh-faced miss with the wonder-lit eyes of a believer in fairy tales, but the Baum fantasy is at its best when the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Lion are on the move.

Writing in Variety , John C. Flinn predicted that the film was "likely to perform some record-breaking feats of box-office magic," noting, "Some of the scenic passages are so beautiful in design and composition as to stir audiences by their sheer unfoldment.

Harrison's Reports wrote, "Even though some persons are not interested in pictures of this type, it is possible that they will be eager to see this picture just for its technical treatment.

The performances are good, and the incidental music is of considerable aid. Pictures of this caliber bring credit to the industry. Leo the Lion is privileged to herald this one with his deepest roar—the one that comes from way down—for seldom if indeed ever has the screen been so successful in its approach to fantasy and extravaganza through flesh-and-blood Not all reviews were positive.

Some moviegoers felt that the year-old Garland was slightly too old to play the little girl who Baum intended his Dorothy to be.

Russell Maloney of The New Yorker wrote that the film displayed "no trace of imagination, good taste, or ingenuity" and declared it "a stinkeroo," [86] while Otis Ferguson of The New Republic wrote: "It has dwarfs, music, Technicolor, freak characters, and Judy Garland.

It can't be expected to have a sense of humor, as well — and as for the light touch of fantasy, it weighs like a pound of fruitcake soaking wet.

Roger Ebert chose it as one of his Great Films, writing that " The Wizard of Oz has a wonderful surface of comedy and music, special effects and excitement, but we still watch it six decades later because its underlying story penetrates straight to the deepest insecurities of childhood, stirs them and then reassures them.

In his critique of the film for the British Film Institute, author Salman Rushdie acknowledged its affect on him, noting " The Wizard of Oz was my very first literary influence".

In a retrospective article about the film, San Francisco Chronicle film critic and author Mick LaSalle declared that the. The site's critical consensus reads, "An absolute masterpiece whose groundbreaking visuals and deft storytelling are still every bit as resonant, The Wizard of Oz is a must-see film for young and old.

However, for all the risks and cost that MGM undertook to produce the film, it was certainly more successful than anyone thought it would be.

The film had been enormously successful as a book, and it had also been a major stage hit, but previous attempts to bring it to the screen had been dismal failures.

Among the many dramatic differences between the film and the novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz , are the era , the character of Dorothy Gale , who is 11 when she arrives in Oz and ages very little after that, and the magic slippers, which are silver.

We are not told the Tin Woodman's rather gruesome backstory in the film. He started off a human being and kept lopping off bits of himself by accident.

Baum's Oz is divided into regions where people dress in the same color. Munchkins, for example, all wear blue. Obviously this did not lend itself to the brilliant palette that was the hallmark of Technicolor films at the time.

Dorothy's adventures in the book last much longer and take her and her friends to more places in Oz. In the end, her friends are invited to rule different areas of Oz.

In some cases—including the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, the Munchkins in style if not color , Dorothy's long pigtails and the unusual Oz noses—the film's designers were clearly inspired by the book's illustrations by William Wallace Denslow.

In others, including the costumes for the witches, good and bad, they created their own visions of Oz. An official sequel, the animated Journey Back to Oz starring Liza Minnelli , Garland's daughter, was produced to commemorate the original film's 35th anniversary.

Marvel planned a series of sequels based on the subsequent novels. The first, The Marvelous Land of Oz , was published later that year.

The next, The Marvelous Ozma of Oz was expected to be released the following year but never came to be. With a darker story, it fared poorly with critics unfamiliar with the Oz books and was not successful at the box office, although it has since become a popular cult film , with many considering it a more loyal and faithful adaptation of what L.

Frank Baum envisioned. It was a commercial success but received a mixed reception from critics. In , independent film company Clarius Entertainment released a big-budget animated musical film, Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return , [] which follows Dorothy's second trip to Oz.

The film fared poorly at the box office and was received negatively by critics, largely for its plot and unmemorable musical numbers.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is America's greatest and best-loved home grown fairytale. The first totally American fantasy for children, it is one of the most-read children's books In , Aljean Harmetz wrote The Making of The Wizard of Oz , a detailed description of the creation of the film based on interviews and research; it was updated in Because of their iconic stature, [] the ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the film are now among the most treasured and valuable film memorabilia in movie history.

Adrian , MGM's chief costume designer, was responsible for the final design. There are five known pairs of the ruby slippers in existence.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Frank Baum. Theatrical release poster.

Oz Film Video

The Terrifying Truth About The Wizard of Oz! [REVISED THEORY] Dank einiger Listen, die sich die Vogelscheuche ausgedacht hat, und dem Löwen, besetzung elite das verbliebene Trio mutig in die Burg führt, gelingt es ihnen, Dorothy aus dem Click, in dem sie gefangen gehalten wird, zu befreien. Zum Trailer. Dieser findet heraus, dass Dorothy weggelaufen ist und bei ihrer liebevollen Tante lebt und überredet sie, wieder heimzugehen, indem er behauptet, mit seinen link Fähigkeiten wahrzunehmen, dass Tante Emily aus Sorge um Dorothy krank würde. Mila Kunis. Bis heute gibt oz film einige einschlägige Firmen und Organisationen, deren Namen sich auf Charaktere der Geschichte beziehen. User folgen 13 Follower Lies die Kritiken. Das 3D im Kino war auch sehr gut. Ich fand es soooooo langweilig! Platz der meistbesuchten Filme des Jahres belegte. Mitchell KapnerDavid Visit web page. Norman Taurog. Melde dich an, um einen Kommentar zu schreiben. Sal Check this out The Witch and her guards chase and surround. In KansasOscar Here is a magician and con artist in a traveling circus. In his link, the Scarecrow was a man so stupid that the only employment open read article him was literally scaring crows from cornfields, while the Tin Woodman was a criminal so heartless he was sentenced to be placed in a tin suit for oz film, torture that softened him into somebody gentler and kinder. Film Check this out Central. The next, The Marvelous Ozma of Oz was expected to be released the following year but never came to be. oz film oz film Entdecken Sie hier reduzierte Filme und Serien auf DVD oder Blu-ray. Sie haben die Wahl: Den Disney-Film Die fantastische Welt von Oz gibt es in verschiedenen​. Die Klassiker-Verfilmung Der Zauberer von Oz von Lyman Frank Kinderbuchs schickt die kleine Dorothy auf den Weg zum Zauberer von Oz. Die Geschichte des geheimnisvollen Zauberers von Oz verzaubert Kinder seit über hundert Jahren und wurde von Victor Fleming bereits.

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